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About Meg & Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund

The Meg & Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund helps maintain wildlife populations into the future through support of research, education, habitat protection and habitat restoration, including research on Clark's Nutcrackers as shown here..

Mission

 

The Meg & Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund helps maintain wildlife populations into the future through support of research, education, habitat protection and habitat restoration. Since 2010, the fund has awarded over seventy grants for field work and education that benefits regional wildlife.

Board of Directors

 

Aly Courtemanch  

President

 

Susan Patla

Vice-president

 

Ann Harvey

Secretary

 

Frances Clark

Treasurer

 

Joe Burke

 

Franz Camenzind

Julie Holding

 

Mary Lohuis

Susan Marsh

The Meg & Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund gives small but pivotal grants to researchers working hard to maintain biodiversity.

The Meg & Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund gives small but pivotal grants to researchers working hard to maintain biodiversity. Species studied with our grants vary widely and are often species that don’t get a lot of attention—or for whom there are huge gaps of information.

 

Our grants support projects led by early-career students, often helping them launch their careers in science, as well as projects led by professors and non-profit research organizations.

The M&B Raynes Wildlife Fund is a 501(c)(3) organization: our 501(c)(3) number is 27-5089685. Our volunteer board members keep costs to a bare minimum by operating with no paid staff. Collectively, our board members, community of donors, and grantees stretch every dollar to save our wildlife.

 

We are proud of what donations have helped us accomplish and we hope you are as well. Here are some highlights:

 

We helped the Teton Regional Land Trust survey critical roosting and foraging habitat for sandhill cranes, thereby identifying properties needed to conserve the largest population of sandhill cranes in our ecosystem.

 

We supported herpetologists to monitor western toad populations in Grand Teton National Park, the National Elk Refuge and Yellowstone National Park. This research has identified critical populations for management as part of the Greater Yellowstone Network.

 

We provided remote infrared cameras to the Wyoming Game and Fish Department to evaluate important components of flying squirrel habitat, including their dependence on fungi and lichens as food sources.

 

We financed research to track long-billed curlews, great gray owls, and sagebrush-dependent songbirds, resulting in new discoveries about their migration routes, winter habitat, and nesting needs.

Read more about what donations have helped us accomplish in our e-news. Or, see lists of our grants:

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